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Essays  ·  Travelogs  ·  Poetry   · Comedy   ·  Art  · Digifilm spring 2013
Epic Refresh

Mar. 2013, The Editor

When I first envisioned moocat.net, it was 1996, and the Web was young. The Internet was an almost-secret club for the technically savvy. The walls of this clubhouse were made out of the ignorance of the masses. The idea that Web content might be inadvertently viewed by anyone whom you didn't know, much less by random aunts, nieces, coworkers, or children, was as absurd as the idea that, say, American voters would elect an African American president during our lifetimes.

I proceeded to post content as if it would only be seen by a small group of friends and likeminded Bohemians. No need to censor one's thoughts or words, so long as the writing was good.

But by the time Googling became a verb, my clubhouse door began to dissolve. Only problem: the content was not intended for All. There were tons of poems in the "confessional poetry" tradition, replete with naughty words and adult themes that one might first be exposed to in a college-level poetry writing class. And many of my travelogs were not for the faint of heart.

As originally conceived, moocat.net ran as a literary magazine from August 2001 through March 2007. As the juggernaught of Web accessibility grew over the 2000s, I put out fewer and less frequent "issues," and by the time I put out the last, devoted to the (wrongly presumed) cutting-edge posting of videos on the World Wide Web, moocat.net had been roundly eclipsed by Youtube, WordPress, Flickr, GoDaddy, and, yes, The Facebook. My original "blogs," sent out as email "e-logs" to a small group of friends as I traveled the world in 1995-96 were now something that Any Schmo could do. The clubhouse had been overrun.

I'm older now, working earnestly on the career track and thinking mostly about my family. I can no longer indulge the willful disbelief that anything I've written and posted to moocat.net might be Googled and found objectionable by potential employers, erstwhile stalkers, and just about anyone seeking to check me out.

And so, for now, the moocat naps. He will return, once I've figured out how to recode the site so that anything potentially controversial can be viewed only by invited guests, a la "Facebook."

In the meantime, all the great content contributed by many writers and artists will be preserved. The moocat is not just me but is composed of the wonderful creative work of many contributors, to wit:

(Contributors, in chronological order)
EssayistsName of EssayIssue
Maurice Martin · Watching the Pentagon Burn
· Why I Toast
Sept 2001
Mar 2005
Lynn Landry· Tourist for a Day
· Stopping on the Street for Coltrane: A Real Latter Day Saint
· The Fallopian Chronicles, Part I
· The Fallopian Chronicles, Part II
· The Fallopian Chronicles, Part III
· The Fallopian Chronicles, Part IV
· Mama and Her Figs
· Maria
Oct 2001
May 2002
May 2003
Jan 2004
Apr 2004
Aug 2004
Sept 2006
Byron Vassar· (I Can't Get No) CatisfactionNov 2002
Bruce Fleming· Roswell My Eye: A UFO HoaxMay 2002
Suz Redfearn · Psychic Friends
· Childhood's End
· Strange Bedfellow
· Why I Toast
Mar 2002
Oct 2002
Mar 2005
Mar 2005
Ho Lin · Phantom Lover: Ode to Leslie Cheung
· The Electric Scooter and the Fall of Dot-Com
April 2003
April 2004
Kenya Prach· A Difficult DayOct 2003
Ian Enriquez· Almost EqualMar 2004
Kelly Stafford· Milk DaySept 2003
David Grayson · Why I ToastMar 2005
Michael Stone Johnson · The Origin of Teeth and BonesOct 2001
PoetsName of PoemIssue
Don Gordon· Arrival Nov 2001
Julie Allan · Football's Birthday
· The Edward Gorey Museum
Nov 2001
Nov 2001
Bruce Fleming · Memento Mori Winter 2002
Lynn Landry · Smoking Haiku Spring 2002
David Grayson · Four Haiku
· Lacing Your Shoes: Haiku and the Everyday
· Inside Scoop
· Infinity
Spring 2002
Spring 2002
Fall 2003
Fall 2006
Rodger Kamenetz · Allen Ginsberg Forgives Ezra Pound on Behalf of the Jews
· Golden Days
Spring 2002
Summer 2004
Susan Borie Chambers · Peepshow Kleenex
· Island Logic
Spring 2003
Spring 2003
Rati Saxena · The Absence of Colours, in the World of Colours Fall 2003
Li-Young Lee · I Ask My Mother To Sing
· Nativity
Fall 2003
Fall 2003
Luis Urrea · Flashpoems: Driving I-10, I-25, I-40, I-70 Spring 2004
Jim Henley · Moe Howard Considers the Death of His Brother, Curly Summer 2004
Keith Ekiss · Americat Summer 2004
Kim Cochran · Grandma Said
· Sand Shark
Winter 2005
Winter 2005
Michelle Daugherty · Broken Water Winter 2005
ArtistsName of PieceIssue
Sylvester Hustito (a.k.a. Sobe) · Zuni Katchinas Winter 2001
Melissa Stander · Hector Summer 2002
Robin Liu · Drawings Fall 2003
John Freeman · Photographs
· Photography: Taiwan Food Venders
Fall 2003
Summer 2004
Carolyn Coco · Death of the Bayou Winter 2005
John Guillory · Portraits Fall 2006
Mohamed Tahdaini · Abstract Works Fall2006
HumoristsName of PieceIssue
Maurice Martin (and me) · Cajuns on Fire
· Krawkawkaw Gives a Little
· The Louisiana Cajuns
· The Little X-mas That Wasn't
Spring 2003
Spring 2003
Spring 2003
Fall 2003
Max Burbank · Papa Loves Mambo Winter 2005
VideographersName of PieceIssue
Rob Parrish · Next to Heaven Spring 2007
Phillip Salzman · Mainland Murmurs Spring 2007


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